JudoForum.com: frequency of training - JudoForum.com

Jump to content

Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

frequency of training Rate Topic: -----

#1 User is offline   selfdefenceman 

  • Judo Forum Yonkyu
  • Icon
  • Group: Full Members
  • Posts: 100
  • Joined: 28-November 07

Posted 16 January 2013 - 11:54 PM

I am putting together a new self defence training programme for local police force. Does anyone know of any literature that discusses the best practice for the.number of times a technique should.be demonstrated for optimum benefit? Presumably a single demonstration would be poor practice but I am looking for research or academic literature to explain why and what is appropriate.
0

#2 User is offline   DougNZ 

  • Judo Forum Rokkyu
  • Icon
  • Group: Full Members
  • Posts: 15
  • Joined: 18-December 12

Posted 17 January 2013 - 03:43 AM

View Postselfdefenceman, on 17 January 2013 - 11:54 AM, said:

I am putting together a new self defence training programme for local police force. Does anyone know of any literature that discusses the best practice for the.number of times a technique should.be demonstrated for optimum benefit? Presumably a single demonstration would be poor practice but I am looking for research or academic literature to explain why and what is appropriate.


I'm not sure of any literature and I think it varies a bit, depending on the technique.

I demonstrate once with an overview explanation, making sure I am best orientated to the audience. I then explain a second time, beaking down the technique into stages and explain the pertinent point of each stage. I then repeat that step and ask for questions. Often a question is "Can we see that one more time?" so I will do it once more. That's instructional teaching.

I think it is important for the student to try the technique as soon as possible. That allows them to 'feel' it and, if they have any experience, relate it to other things they have already learnt (either consciously or subconsciously). After some practice time (say, 10 minutes) I may stop the class to give some finer points to improve the basic technique they are doing and/or tighten things up on a one-to-one basis as I walk about and observe. That's corrective teaching.

It's important not to flood a new technique with too much detail; the new student will only take so much of what you say, and the more you say, the less will be retained. Give their bodies time to work out the technique. This is where many newer instructors fall down; in trying to be helpful they give loads of tips and are forever correcting the student on their new technique. All that talking gets in the way of learning by doing.
1

Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic