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Are books even particularly helpful for learning moves? Rate Topic: -----

#1 User is offline   H.y 

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 06:31 AM

I feel like it would be awfully difficult to learn Judo via books. Now, I can understand books for getting into the "do" of judo, or appreciating its history, philosophies, and so forth. But do all these technique books really help?
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#2 User is offline   Shindai Warrior 

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 07:01 AM

View PostH.y, on 04 February 2012 - 11:31 PM, said:

I feel like it would be awfully difficult to learn Judo via books. Now, I can understand books for getting into the "do" of judo, or appreciating its history, philosophies, and so forth. But do all these technique books really help?


Yes.
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#3 User is offline   7thCuil 

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 07:16 AM

Hello,
I personaly think that they do, particularly if they contain photographs and/or diagrams that
are detailed and accurate. Descriptions of throws and their variations can also be highly useful
for reference and looking at methods expanding upon or that may be slightly different to the ones
you have been taught is always useful. Other information provided makes for good background
knowledge and is often a fascinating read.
This all, of course, depends on the book, and the person. I like reading about techniques,
but the best way to actualy learn them is always to be taught by your Sensei, and then practice.
I certainly wouldn't recomend trying to learn Judo primarily or entierly from books to anyone, for a
whole range of reasons, nor is it a good idea to try out a new technique that you've read
about but never actualy been taught, though the temptation is often there.
But anyway, for me, I find a good book can be invaluable for research or reference, as well as learning
more about the history of and ideas behind Judo. It's always good to read about something that
interests you- in this respect, Judo is no different.
I believe that there is a subforum elswhere in this site specificaly for discussing and
reccomending books on Judo- if you're interested, perhaps take a look there. I took many
of my suggestions for reading material from this site and they have all proven to be good
ones. :rolleyes:
I hope this is useful.

Lyss

This post has been edited by Lystra: 05 February 2012 - 07:17 AM

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#4 User is offline   danguy 

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 07:16 AM

View PostH.y, on 04 February 2012 - 10:31 PM, said:

I feel like it would be awfully difficult to learn Judo via books. Now, I can understand books for getting into the "do" of judo, or appreciating its history, philosophies, and so forth. But do all these technique books really help?

Yes, if you read a quality book. They are covered in the book section of gear.
If I am doing "win," sloppy and sissy is fine; if I am doing Judo, beautiful is my rule and goal. Judo is far more important and rewarding than "win."

"What you are as a person is far more important than what you are as a basketball [Judo] player." --John Wooden 1910-2010

"You should first try to negotiate nicely but you can be strong after there's resistance, and know, just like in judo, when to catch them." --Rusty Kanokogi, 2008, on negotiating.
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#5 User is offline   H.y 

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 08:13 AM

Thanks everyone. Great to know! And yes, I posted this in the book section about gear. Most the recommended books were on forms, which is why I started this thread.
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#6 User is offline   danguy 

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 08:45 AM

View PostH.y, on 05 February 2012 - 12:13 AM, said:

Thanks everyone. Great to know! And yes, I posted this in the book section about gear. Most the recommended books were on forms, which is why I started this thread.

http://JudoForum.com...post__p__671934

http://JudoForum.com...post__p__626986

Daigo on Kodokan Throws
The Dynamic Judo pair (expensive)
Vital Judo
All Masterclass
If I am doing "win," sloppy and sissy is fine; if I am doing Judo, beautiful is my rule and goal. Judo is far more important and rewarding than "win."

"What you are as a person is far more important than what you are as a basketball [Judo] player." --John Wooden 1910-2010

"You should first try to negotiate nicely but you can be strong after there's resistance, and know, just like in judo, when to catch them." --Rusty Kanokogi, 2008, on negotiating.
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#7 User is offline   Jonesy 

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 11:26 AM

Books written by outstanding judoka and judo scholars such as Daigo, Okano, Kudo etc are worth their weight in gold. What other mechanisms are there for most people to gain insight into their perspectives and thinking on judo?

Books written by champions such as Yamashira, Adams can prove motivating and inspirational.

Most of what is on YouTube is crap just as are most judo books are mediocre re-hashes of each other.
Dr Llyr C Jones
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#8 User is offline   seatea 

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 12:55 PM

I have found them useful in re-enforcing what was taught in class. Also with terminology, names of throws etc.
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#9 User is offline   neilm1990 

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 03:48 PM

Erm depends on the book.

Comprehensive Ones which give more than an general overview would be Judo Sensei's Black Belt which i found to be really useful and an easy read not to complicated. I really recommend Masao Takahashi's book(although his whole family contribute to it) which gives you a guide to the history, gives training ideas aswell as covering techniques. Its a very thorough bloke with alot of science in it.

Judo: The Skills of the Game, was the first judo book I ever read and I found it really useful although the layout doesn't suit my reading style.

For a general overview of the different techniques Judoinfo is great(thats a webpage) failing that I always stand by the A-Z of Judo by Syd Hoare. Although it may need the prohibited techniques updating inline with the IJF rules. It gives basic instruction on techniques.

The masterclass series, I have not read much of however Shime Waza by Katsuhiko Kashiwazaki i really liked. The others I have briefly skimmed over look really good to.

All of these can probably be picked off Ebay quite cheaply(dont quote me on it though).

Hope this helps
"Size Matters Not" Grandmaster Yoda
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