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#1 User is offline   Danny66 

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Posted 29 November 2011 - 04:05 PM

My friend will be visiting Japan the end of Feb. and I was wondering if someone could recommend a few gyms where he'd be able to train? He is a new student, with only a few months of experience. He enjoys the ground work as much as the stand up.
Where would be the best place for him to visit, if he wanted to train Kosen rules Judo? He'd like to find the best Kosen rules club, so he can learn more about exactly how they train. Any suggestions?

Also, are there any clubs where the training is 50/50 (ground/throwing)??

Thanks,
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#2 User is offline   Steve Leadbeater 

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Posted 29 November 2011 - 10:00 PM

Kosen Rules Judo...............

Is that different to JUDO ??
Do unto others BEFORE they DO you !!!

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#3 User is offline   Budoka 

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Posted 29 November 2011 - 10:11 PM

Newaza Kennkyukai or one of the 7 State Universities that participate. Tokyo University being one. However he will need an introduction to all of these places.
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#4 User is offline   Budoka 

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Posted 29 November 2011 - 10:13 PM

I just noticed you said he is a new student. Unfortunately that means he most likely wouldn't be permitted to train at the places I just suggested. What's wrong with the Kodokan?
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#5 User is offline   Budoka 

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Posted 29 November 2011 - 10:16 PM

View PostSteve Leadbeater, on 30 November 2011 - 07:00 AM, said:

Kosen Rules Judo...............

Is that different to JUDO ??

Haha. No there is no such thing as "Kosen Judo" there is indeed "Kosen rules judo" shiai. They still occur twice a year in Japan.
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#6 User is offline   judoratt 

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Posted 30 November 2011 - 12:46 AM

View PostBudoka, on 29 November 2011 - 02:13 PM, said:

I just noticed you said he is a new student. Unfortunately that means he most likely wouldn't be permitted to train at the places I just suggested. What's wrong with the Kodokan?



Not being Ikyu or higher few places will want to bother with you. And as stated earlier you need to be introduced or reccomended most places to get on the mat. The Kodokan would be the most welcoming place in Tokyo.
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#7 User is offline   Danny66 

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Posted 30 November 2011 - 12:52 AM

He may end up going to the Kodokan, but he did want to visit a club that focused on Ne Waza. Surely even a beginner could stop by these clubs to train, and ask questions? I hate to think that things over there are so 'formal/traditional' that a beginner is treated like a second class citizen.

Does anyone here have any contact info for any of the Ne Waza clubs? If so, it would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks.
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#8 User is offline   Budoka 

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Posted 30 November 2011 - 02:21 AM

View PostDanny66, on 30 November 2011 - 09:52 AM, said:

He may end up going to the Kodokan, but he did want to visit a club that focused on Ne Waza. Surely even a beginner could stop by these clubs to train, and ask questions? I hate to think that things over there are so 'formal/traditional' that a beginner is treated like a second class citizen.

Does anyone here have any contact info for any of the Ne Waza clubs? If so, it would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks.

Uh...no. It isn't a matter of "formal/tradition" but safety amongst other things. The university clubs here are the elite in Japan and are in no way appropriate for a beginner to practice at.

The Newaza Kennkyukai would probably allow him to visit but once again it is a grueling practice not terribly suited for beginners.

What Steve was driving at is that it is all Judo. There are clubs in Japan that are stronger in newaza but they all practice it to some degree. I am sure the newaza at the Kodokan would be more than enough for your friend.

What I would advise him to do is when he arrives in Japan talk to the international dept at the KDK and explain his interest. They are best suited to advise him.

This post has been edited by Budoka: 30 November 2011 - 02:23 AM

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#9 User is offline   Jon Z 

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Posted 30 November 2011 - 03:52 AM

I think Budoka has already give you some good advice and as someone living in Japan he's probably in the best position. But as a newish judoka who has traveled to Japan for short periods of time for each of the last three years (beginning with about 8 months of training under my belt) I thought I would give you my perspective. Japan basically is not set up for a relative novice to visit clubs. There is very little adult beginning instruction and the KDK is probably the best place to do that but my understanding is that aside from things like the summer intensive course they are not really able to accommodate relative novices for short periods of time. If it's for a year or so then that's the place to go otherwise you could show up and try to find randori partners but that's sort of it in my experience.

I've been fortunate because one of the posters on this forum who lives in Japan was good friends with my sensei here in the US so he really helped me out. And another poster has taken me to the KDK on a number of occasions and introduced me to people and really helped me out. I also speak Japanese so was able to spend some time at a small local dojo.

But to be honest (and I hope I don't get crucified for suggesting this :ph34r: ) if your fried is 1) a relative novice 2) not going to be there for more than a month or two 3) not able to speak Japanese and 4) interested in newaza I would go here: http://www.triforce-...m/en/index.html

Yes, I know it's a BJJ place :o but I trained with them a bit this past summer and it's a great place, very welcoming, they speak English, there is real instruction, there are other non-Japanese, and they are set up to deal with having people there on a weekly or monthly basis. Yeah, I know, traveling to Tokyo to study BJJ is kinda f@#%ing crazy but to be honest what I've seen of the way judo works in Japan as a novice there really aren't a lot of options. Overall the KDK is great and really welcoming but even the KDK summer course which I did last summer wasn't really designed for novices. I was ikkyu and was pretty much the lowest ranked person there and I wouldn't have gotten much out of it if I had earlier in my judo career which I had wanted to do but couldn't get the timing lined up.

Just my two cents and for the record I'm not a rabid BJJ evangelist or anything I just think realistically that's you're friend's best option.

Jon Z
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#10 User is offline   judomarshall 

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Posted 30 November 2011 - 05:18 AM

View PostBudoka, on 30 November 2011 - 07:11 AM, said:

Newaza Kennkyukai or one of the 7 State Universities that participate. Tokyo University being one. However he will need an introduction to all of these places.


just curious and completely off topic, so feel free to ignore this if it has no relevance, but how important is an introduction?
I have lived in Japan for 6 years and have never been denied an opportunity to attend a class because i didnt have an introduction.

The only thing that seemed to differ between having an introduction and no introduction is the treatment you receive.
however, once people see that you are serious and can follow the rules, this is usually not a problem.

anyways, for a beginner, id have to concur with jon z. BJJ is a nice alternative.
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#11 User is offline   Danny66 

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Posted 30 November 2011 - 07:40 PM

Thanks to all of you for your comments! There's nothing better than listening to people who've 'been-there-done that'. The climate there, in terms of dropping in somewhere to train, is obviously very different, but then again, it's a very different place/culture.

I will pass this onfo on to him, and he can decide what he wants to do.

Thanks Again!
Danny
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#12 User is offline   NBK 

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Posted 01 December 2011 - 12:20 AM

View Postjudomarshall, on 30 November 2011 - 02:18 PM, said:

just curious and completely off topic, so feel free to ignore this if it has no relevance, but how important is an introduction?
I have lived in Japan for 6 years and have never been denied an opportunity to attend a class because i didnt have an introduction.

The only thing that seemed to differ between having an introduction and no introduction is the treatment you receive.
however, once people see that you are serious and can follow the rules, this is usually not a problem.

anyways, for a beginner, id have to concur with jon z. BJJ is a nice alternative.

The university dojo are typically on university grounds, and typically you're not supposed to enter without permission or a reason (looking for judo is probably not the best reason...).

Sure, you can just make your way. There are very few barriers to judo, but most folks want you to join. Most of the subsidized dojo are related to some city govt or another, some places won't let you join unless you can establish that you have a work or residential address in that ward or city.

Introductions help you to shortcut the time required to demonstrate 'you are serious and can follow the rules'.


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#13 User is offline   Co tenBroek 

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Posted 01 December 2011 - 02:14 AM

Danny, do you know where your friend will be going? A friend of mine knows of a couple of dojos which would welcome a guest.
Co tenBroek
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#14 User is offline   Ogami Ito 

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Posted 01 December 2011 - 07:36 AM

Hi. I am a member of one of the dojo (NewaKen) recommended to you. I think you have received a lot of good comments about practice here and concur that it may not be the best option for you but send me a PM with specifics and I can tell you what I think.
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#15 User is offline   Danny66 

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Posted 09 December 2011 - 07:19 PM

Co tenBroek

He will be in Japan for a month, and will be travelling all over Japan, wherever he wants to go. He's a very nice guy, who's simply looking to learn as much as he can about Judo while he's there.

Thanks,
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