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#1 User is offline   Taigyo 

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Posted 12 October 2011 - 02:48 PM

So how do you think we could encourage people to bring kata back into the realm of regular training? That is really the only way it can survive and be a vital part of Judo?
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#2 User is offline   danguy 

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Posted 12 October 2011 - 03:23 PM

View PostTaigyo, on 12 October 2011 - 07:48 AM, said:

So how do you think we could encourage people to bring kata back into the realm of regular training? That is really the only way it can survive and be a vital part of Judo?

Large bore handgun pointed at the head...

Or

Riner and Yamashita doing Ju no kata to start each clinic.
If I am doing "win," sloppy and sissy is fine; if I am doing Judo, beautiful is my rule and goal. Judo is far more important and rewarding than "win."

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#3 User is offline   Tafftaz 

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Posted 12 October 2011 - 04:30 PM

View Postdanguy, on 12 October 2011 - 04:23 PM, said:

Large bore handgun pointed at the head...

Or

Riner and Yamashita doing Ju no kata to start each clinic.


:lol: Made me chuckle
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#4 User is offline   Tafftaz 

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Posted 12 October 2011 - 04:35 PM

View PostTaigyo, on 12 October 2011 - 03:48 PM, said:

So how do you think we could encourage people to bring kata back into the realm of regular training? That is really the only way it can survive and be a vital part of Judo?


A good friend of mine who won a silver at world kata champs had a similar discussion with me some months back.
He to was of the same mind as you. His solution to me was to use a light, moving,throw for throw basis with the nage no kata. Also not restrict the kata to its fairly rigid movement patterns. His thinking behind it was that the students were learning kata when they actually thought that they were doing normal nage komi.
Very hard for me to explain but it seems to work.
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#5 User is offline   heikojr 

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Posted 12 October 2011 - 05:05 PM

View PostTafftaz, on 12 October 2011 - 01:35 PM, said:

His solution to me was to use a light, moving,throw for throw basis with the nage no kata. Also not restrict the kata to its fairly rigid movement patterns. His thinking behind it was that the students were learning kata when they actually thought that they were doing normal nage komi.


I agree with this! I have been trying this with a small group of students and it seems to be working. We practice right before randori during our early morning class.

I have also been trying to work with juniors on kata. They seem to really enjoy it! And if they grow up as it being part of their Judo training they never have the chance to not like it --- it is just part of Judo to them, as it should be!

heikojr
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#6 User is offline   jkw 

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Posted 12 October 2011 - 09:55 PM

View PostTafftaz, on 12 October 2011 - 05:35 PM, said:

His solution to me was to use a light, moving,throw for throw basis with the nage no kata. Also not restrict the kata to its fairly rigid movement patterns. His thinking behind it was that the students were learning kata when they actually thought that they were doing normal nage komi.
Very hard for me to explain but it seems to work.


I learned some ju-no-kata and some of a version of kaeshi-no-kata this way, slotted in for a few minutes after warm-ups and break-falls. Very enjoyable and, indeed, just a part of 'regular' training.
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#7 User is offline   Taigyo 

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Posted 13 October 2011 - 05:27 PM

Interesting how people fuss about "rigid movement patterns". Kata is not meant to be robotic, that is just the way lots of people do it. This is probably because they never get past the learning stage. The ironic thing is that they fuss about tsugi ashi and then if you watch them in randori they are doing it all the time. It would probably help if it were presented this way in nage no kata, along with an explanation of the reasons for this sort of movement.

Another thing that probably turns people off is being too critical when they are first starting. They never make it through the whole thing because they are hit with so many criticisms and instructions that it is just a mass of negativity to them. One of my teachers uses the example of peeling the onion, just a layer at a time. Allow them to get the general feel of the kata before zooming in on details. Also in some ways, allowing them to do it wrong before correcting a detail adds to the learning experience when you correct them, they do it and it suddenly works.

The other point is that in trying to popularize kata you should avoid simplifying or modifying it too much. Kata is also an information storage device. There are things that your are required to do at the beginning that seem to be overly picky or make no real difference. However as your knowledge of the kata (and of Judo) increases you often have sudden insights as to the why of the particular detail. If these are discarded or ignored then this information is lost.

In saying that you should preserve the kata there is also the problem that in the U.S. at least kata has been grossly misinterpreted. It is an unfamiliar form of training to most of us and presented as some sort of oddity or perhaps a trial that you have to endure to get your shodan. If I had a nickel for every black belt I have heard comment "well its kata, so it doesn't really work, you have to jump a little", or perhaps a very large stick......... <_<
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#8 User is offline   Tafftaz 

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Posted 13 October 2011 - 06:42 PM

View PostTaigyo, on 13 October 2011 - 06:27 PM, said:

or perhaps a very large stick......... <_<


I'd stick with Danguys large bore handgun :big grin:
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#9 User is offline   heikojr 

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Posted 13 October 2011 - 07:12 PM

View PostTaigyo, on 13 October 2011 - 02:27 PM, said:

Another thing that probably turns people off is being too critical when they are first starting. They never make it through the whole thing because they are hit with so many criticisms and instructions that it is just a mass of negativity to them.

It is an unfamiliar form of training to most of us and presented as some sort of oddity or perhaps a trial that you have to endure to get your shodan.


I feel these two thoughts are major reasons why people don't practice kata! And they go hand in hand! But look at them the way in which they occur:

The first, entering unfamiliar teritory. Most students barely touch any formal kata training until right before their shodan. They've trained for years and are about to make this step to shodan when suddenly they have to perform some pre-arranged movements...

Second, a mass of negativity. Here is the student trying something that they've never tried before and they get bombbarded with negative comments. No kata will ever be perfect, but it is hard to understand when someone is constantly giving negative feedback. You got to give a dog a bone every once in a while!

People need to have kata taught as part of regular class as a regular learning tool of Judo. The fact that they are practicing kata will be half the battle. They will accept it as part of their Judo learning experience. Their kata will be better than most just because they practice, which in turn will make their judo better, which in turn will make their kata better, ect.

heikojr
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#10 User is offline   johan smits 

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 12:24 PM

View PostTaigyo, on 12 October 2011 - 03:48 PM, said:

So how do you think we could encourage people to bring kata back into the realm of regular training? That is really the only way it can survive and be a vital part of Judo?



Long time ago when I still practised judo we used to train the first two or three techniques of Nage no kata during the warm up, next to ukemi. Uki otoshi as an exercise for ukemi, seoi nage as a self-defence technique and kata guruma for weight-lifting for tori and stetching (keep staight) for uke.
In a rather loose way people got used to the first series of nage no kata.
We did not train for championships that is true but we had a lot of fun. Maybe when kata practice is fun more people will get enthousiastic.

fwiw

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#11 User is offline   Allen 

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Posted 21 October 2011 - 12:50 AM

We had a student come from Japan. I asked him about kata, and he said he had studied only Nage no kata. He had obviously been doing Judo his whole life and was a nidan. Seems like they don't put much emphasis on it there (at least for him) except for promotions; sounds like the U.S.
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#12 User is offline   heikojr 

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Posted 21 October 2011 - 06:56 PM

Much of the reason that kata is not studied is due to the emphasis put on randori and shiai and winning. Teachers/coaches/sensei, whatever you want to call the instructor, need to show their students that Judo is more than winning a shiai. Judo is not soley about the defeating of ones opponent.

Perhaps some instructors don't know/understand the importance of kata and how it can help their/ their student's judo...

Also, in connection with my other post, if a students grows up with the freedom of randori or freeplay at every class (and never or rarely practices kata) then when it come time to teach the foreign concept of kata they do not enjoy it.

heikojr
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#13 User is offline   danguy 

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Posted 21 October 2011 - 08:39 PM

This belongs here as well:

View PostCichorei Kano, on 17 October 2011 - 08:48 PM, said:

As you may know, Kanō Jigorō conceived Kōdōkan jūdō as a system of mental and physical education, NOT as a martial art. But, this system of education instead of being merely based on either classical Oriental education (for example, Confucianism), or classical Western educational systems, it used moral principles, and physical techniques that originated in classical Japanese martial arts. The philosophical framework was offered seeking inspiration in a number of Western philosophers and educators (notably, J. Dewey, J. Stuart Mill, and H. Spencer) and Eastern moral philosophy (notably, neoconfucianism which in itself is also the major basis to bushidō).

Kanō essentially only wrote two books, of which only one was about jūdō. In his 1911 book (which is not about jūdō) he extensively explains the need for moral development and how education may provide assistance to this. In doing so, he extensively lies the moral framework that underpins the physical activities in jūdō. Those physical activities had as a purpose to improve the health of the people. Very central in Kanō’s goals would be the replacement in schools and implementation of a new standardized system of physical exercises which can be peformed by anyone in any condition, and which he would term his National System of Physical Education. Thus, his idea was to put jūdō at the service of everyone, also those who had no interest in further studying jūdō. But for those who were interested in deeper exploring jūdō and gain expertise in what it had to offer, he provided two main systems of practice: randori and kata. Kanō emphasized over and over that the practice of both is essential to Kōdōkan jūdō.

References for this are inter alia:

Kanō J. Kata randori renshū no mokuteki wo roku . [The meaning of kata and randori practice], which appeared in the periodical Judo volume 1 (spread over 3 issues) of 1930.

Kanō J. Ichiban shūgyōsha ni kata no renshū wo susumeru. [General recommendations to the judo disciple for the study of kata], which appeared in November issue of volume 7 of the periodical Yūkō-no-Katsudō of 1921.

Somewhat of a short synthesis is provided by:

Murata N. What is kata ? The congratulatory address to the 1st Kodokan Judo Kata International Tournament, which appeared in the Program Brochure of the 1st Kodokan Judo Kata International Tournament, held on October 27th – 28th of 2007 at the Kōdōkan.

However, the critical issue that is implied in your question and the perception of many, and without realizing so, is what precisely is covered by the term ‘kata’. You may know or you may not know, that the term kata in generally is completely misunderstood in the West. This is an unfortunate legacy of how jūdō became introduced in the West and how the requirements to obtain the in those pioneering days still legendary black belt were formulated.

When you introduce the terms randori vs. kata, the majority of people erroneously understands this as fighting vs. formal demonstrations that start with bowing and ends with bowing. In other words, when you mention kata, they hear doing a complete formal exercise like Nage-no-kata, for example. This is, however, not at all what is meant by randori and kata being essential, and not at all what the term kata means in Kōdōkan jūdō.

The difference between both really only is unscripted, thus improvised jūdō activity vs. predetermined, agreed jūdō practice. For example, Kanō having extensively reflected about the advantages and disadvantages of classical jūjutsu, and bearing in mind that his major goal with Kōdōkan jūdō was to increase the health (and educational and moral level) of the population quite fundamentally tried to exclude from jūdō that what potentially might worsen or damage people’s health (as he conceived it). For that reason, for example, he believed that performing a necklock or knee lock in an unscripted form bears to great of a risk, since if you react too late or in the wrong way, your injury (consider medical treatment towards the end of the 19th century) could have very serious consequences. Therefore he offered the alternative to only perform these in a scripted way. That means, I am telling you which neck lock or knee lock I am going to perform, and we agree beforehand on what we consider as an effective defense, and this we will practice a few times. That is what the term kata implies. It has nothing to do with robotic performances.

Doing kata in a demonstrative way before an audience is something that dates from much, much later than the creation of kata, and has in essence nothing to do with practice of kata in jūdō. These actual demonstration were introduced at a certain point in time, almost as a form of lecture or as a marketing experiment to provide an audience with a short introduction of what jūdō had to offer. Today, this would likely have been largely replaced by 4-color brochures, video, tweets, etc, by means of speaking.

Thus, there is nothing special really about kata being a major form of practice. This is virtually the only way you can practice martial arts in a traditional setting. How on earth would you practice martial arts using a real sword ? In the form of randori ? Your career would be very short. Thus, virtually the only form those martial could be practiced was as kata. However, the general jūdō population also errs in how they imagine these actual kata are performed. They think that this is on a willing uke who even facilitates the exercise. That too is complete nonsense, and the result of modern lack of understanding. The practice of kata was, is and should be heavy, with its practitioners ending up being out of breath just like when doing randori. Uke would use various levels of resistance, forcing tori to do his utmost best and improve his technique to still being able to throw jūdō. Of course, this would be done to a much lesser degree doing a formal demonstration of kata. Is this a surprise ? When was a formal demonstration of kata done ? Well, this goes back to May 20th of 1894 when the inaugural ceremony for the opening of the new Shimotomisaka Kōdōkan dōjō took place. To honor those people who had given money to sponsor the new dōjō, as well as to bring several high-placed personalities together, a large demonstration was organized. At that occasion randori was demonstrated, namely 6 matches, of which some positioned Kōdōkan jūdōka vs. Jūjutsuka, and some positioned jūjutsuka vs. other jūjutsuka. Those were fighting matches with the idea being to show a winner, thus an individual’s superiority. In addition, the rest of the program wanted to show some of the contents of the different schools, so 8 jūjutsu schools showed their normal training program, i.e. kata. One of those schools was Kitō-ryū, represented by Kanō and Yamashita. This was a great success, a novel type of what really was some sort of formal reception.

Kanō repeated something similar 1898 and even then was only limited to Kanō himself giving a formal demonstration before an audience with the intention really to reflect a level of mastership in mental and self-control. In none of those demonstrations there were any jūdō kata as people know them by name today. Even the kata from jūjutsu that were retained in Kōdōkan jūdō (i.e. Koshiki-no-kata and Itsutsu-no-kata) were still demonstrated as jūjutsu, and Koshiki-no-kata still did not even have that name and was still presented under is normal jūjutsu name. Itsutsu was never included by Kanō as he was still struggling with that form until much later.

The formal demonstration of other kata, thus jūdō kata before an audience only started in January 1901, based on the successful 1894 and 1898 formal receptions. Indeed, in 1901 formal demonstration of set exercises from the Kōdōkan jūdō syllabus (= kata in demonstrative form) were introduced as part of the Kagami Biraki ceremony. This has nothing to do whatsoever with the PRACTICE of kata. Those formal demonstrations is not what doing kata means. What they reflect is mere ceremonial scenario that is intended for receptions and similar. Unfortunately, very unfortunately, it is this what 110 years later in the minds of the majority of jūdōka has sublimated as that what kata would be, and this is very sad. With the introduction of “kata competitions” this impression has even strengthened.

The confusion is total because of the multiple meanings of the same Japanese word kata, which (in jūdō) at the same time means anything you do that is not improvisation. So, if I say, I’d like to practice this new combination of tai-otoshi. OK, I am first going to attack with ō-uchi-gari, then you step over, and I am going to come in with tai-otoshi. Now, THAT is what kata is. How on earth would learn jūdō without kata ? You would simply go and try this idea for the first time during shiai ? Makes no sense, given how much practice it takes before you can master a technique. Everyone in jūdō continuously practices kata … they only do not realize they are …

This is not even limited to jūdō. They are practicing kata in boxing clubs, in BJJ clubs and in MMA clubs. You hit or kick a bag. Are you practicing randori ? Hardly, the bag is not going to hit bag with an improvised technique, or suddenly jump over you. At the most it will swing limited by the laws of physics. And you, you determine yourself before hand whether you will kick or hit, or whatever. That is kata, just like Okano with inner tubed tied to a tree was practicing all the time for the Olympics and All Japan Championships spending a lot of his time thus training kata (as well as obviously also spending a lot of time doing randori meaning, fighting opponents who would do and resist techniques without disclosing beforehand what these would be). This is also the irony. You will constantly hear people raising all sorts of objections against kata practice, when in reality they are practicing kata all the time. However, since the term is misunderstood, it isn’t a discussion, since several parties are understanding something else under the same term. When someone argues that kata is not a good form of practice, but nage-komi is ????? And what form of practice is nage-komi then ? It is kata. There are not other forms of practice in jūdō, but randori and kata (although Kanō introduced lectures and discussions as part of jūdō teaching/learning, but they are not actual forms of training). Nage-komi is not randori. You decide before that you are going to throw the person with technique X, hence it is scripted, and it is form of kata.

There is another way to illustrate this. Kōdōkan jūdō does not just include Tachi-waza and ne-waza, it also contains a third division (Ata-waza), and a fourth division (Kappō). Well, the Kappō or Resuscitation exercise inter alia contain a technique to revive a person drowning. We perform this as kata, meaning, the instructor shows the technique, your opponent takes the place of the person drowned and you perform the technique a couple of times. It is scripted, and is thus kata. The randori application of this would be the non-scripted version, i.e. you throw someone in the middle of a lake, see if he survives or not, you jump after him with the outcome completely unknown, meaning you may drown both, or you may have you nuts eaten by the local piranhas, or you might end up being saved by the Darryl Hannah shaking her tail. There is nothing ceremonial about this. Now, imagine, you would like to give a quick overview of 19th century First Aid, showing to a couple of people the jūdō’s entire First Aid curriculum, well, you then probably will want to streamline the different options. That is really what happens in a kata demonstration. That demonstration form would only represent an extremely minor application of kata, and not the whole concept of kata in itself, with the sole exception that Kanō also wanted to preserve the historic legacy of the sources from which jūdō was derived, as well as that he wanted jūdō to be accessible for all without having as in classical budō a secret level or hiden and kuden. So, he did also put the historic legacy of jūdō as well as its goku’i only in the form of kata, as this was the only way to preserve after he would be gone. That is also, why those few things should be left untouched, just like you would not engineer Leonardo’s Da Vinci with spray paint or other techniques to bring it more in line with modern photography and moderns ways of dressing and wearing your hair; it is an item that is antique that reflects the times of when it was made, and the genius of the person who made it at that time. Similarly, the goku’i of jūdō cannot be changed, but again that applies only to an extremely small and advanced part of jūdō where the majority of its practitioners never arrive, so it should not bee too much of a concern.

The 99.5% other parts in the contents of jūdō are practiced both in the form of kata and randori by all of us, including those who say they hate part of think they don’t practice it. What the people who generally say that they don’t do kata actually mean, is that they don’t engage I the ceremonial demonstration application of jūdō, but they do kata alright, believe me. There is no sensible person who from the moment he steps on the mat starts doing randori without warm-up or anything else and just practices fighting. Even warm-up is kata, as you or the instruction decide what you are doing, and that is repeated, thus scripted, even if scripted on the spot. In fact most activities we learn in life are learnt through the practice of both randori and kata. All Kanō was saying was to give an early century dumbed-down verion of what is commonly accept in modern developmental psychology. Even natural activities such as a baby learning to walk does so using both randori (the spontaneous attempts to transition from crawling to standing with falling over, with trying to grab his hands to the side of furniture) and kata (the parent taking the baby by the hand saying “and now we are going to put one foot before another, repeat after me, let’s just make a few steps”). Even in complex learnt activities both randori and kata are used. Imagine a pilot or a surgeon training. The randori form is to step back and tell the student pilot here’s the controls now you try and get this jet on the ground succeed or fail, the kata form is: “this is what we are going to do: flaps 15, fuel pumps on, reverse thrust armed, reduce airspeed 150 knots, intercept localizer, glideslope active, outer marker, gear down, minimums, visual, reverse thrust”; that’s the “pilot’s kata”, just like there is cardiovascular surgeon’s ‘kata’, or we have kata in whatever job it is we do. There are activities which benefit greater from the randori form and there are activities which benefit more from the kata form, but the two are complementary, and only these two exist as training forms in Kōdōkan jūdō as established by Kanō.

The above is largely the same in other budō, but not always 100% identical. For example, karate in addition, has the training form ‘kihon’, in addition to kata and kumite. Some sensei in jūdō use the term ‘kihon’ but it is virtually not met outside of Japan. For example, Kashiwazaki Katsuhiko, a well-known newaza champion and expert many readers here are familiar with, uses the term ‘kihon’ sometimes. There is nothing against that, but it is not one a fundamental category of training forms in jūdō as postulated by Kanō. Thus kihon in jūdō is considered kata, even though in karate it is not. There is only randori and kata in jūdō (in addition to kōgi [lectures] en mondō [discussion]) as basic training forms. All kinds of subdivisions or applications were later created including yaku-soku-geiko, nage-komi, kakari-geiko, mitori-geiko, sute-geiko, uchi-komi, gokaku-geiko, hikitate-geiko, kazu-geiko, and buai-geiko. However, randori and kata go back to the fundamental principles of Kōdōkan jūdō, so they are of a different level than these applications; the application do not replace those fundamental principles. In other words, you can practice either kata or randori in mitori-geiko (= watching others perform it), or in hikitate-geiko (= with a person of inferior level), or in sute-geiko (= with a large difference in skill, e.g. a 5th dan with a 3rd kyū), or in gokaku-geiko (= of similar technical level), etc.

One of our longtime forum collaborators, Josh, pointed out something worthwile. If kata is the grammar of jūdō, and as a write you are an excellent linguist, that still does not make you a great writer. It is also true, that there have been great writers who may have been lousy in grammar. But this statement re-interpretes the term ‘writer’. Really what is meant, is that there have been great “story tellers” who may have been lousy in grammar. Of course ‘writing’ has not been established by a creator or founder, but if we accept that really a good writer is he or she who has great mastership of both story telling and grammar, then we are getting closer to Kanō’s idea. Kanō never said that someone should focus on kata and not on randori, or on randori but not on kata. On the contrary; the two are complementary, and the two should be practiced, which is what most good jūdōka do, though the proportion of each is often not 50%. That is not a blasphemy since jūdō is a lifetime learning exercise. Therefore it is acceptable that at certain points of life the proportion devoted to one may be lower or greater. Let’s take Toshirō Daigo. No sensible jūdōka will question his skills as a jūdōka. When he won the All Japan Championships in the early 1950s, he focused on randori, and in lesser proportions on kata, usually in the form of uchi-komi of his tokui-waza intended for use in contests. Now, as an octogenarian, his proportion of randori has been reduced to almost zero, with his focus being almost entirely on kata, that is: uchi-komi usually of ō-soto-gari and seoi-nage, and the teaching of jūdō’s goku’i in the form of its parent-school’s legacy, Koshiki-no-kata. This seems a very acceptable devotion to us of his tremendous experience, skills and knowledge. This is virtually the same in any legendary Japanese jūdōka.

Some may wish to enjoy one of the writings in English by Kanō, who wrote this exposé that appeared in this 1922 newspaper article, and which contains some relevant reflections on the material discussed in this thread.

Attachment JigoroKano-JudoAsPhysical&amp;MentalCulture-JapanAdvertiser-29Jul1922.pdf

Now, go to this thread where the original poster asked a question and people are talking about nage-no-kata and katame-no-kata, etc. I would almost ask, what does that have to do with kata ? Nage-no-kata was created in lieu of a teacher syllabus, when the number of members explosively increased short-term to the extent that it became physically impossible for Kanō to teach every single pupil. There was no jūdō instructor program yet, the Budō Senmogakkō (Busen) did not yet exist, there were no jūdō teacher schools. Thus, a series of 10 scripted movements was created to serve as a mnemonic for junior instructors (there were no others) so that they actually knew what to teach to students, and in what progressive order. They had no alternative as they could not read Kanō’s mind, and Kanō had never written anything out about jūdō yet. The journal Kokusai was not created until about 1897, so for 15 years there was almost zero documentation except the Meiji era books on jūjutsu, and the antique scrolls of Kōdōkan’s parent schools. Nage-no-kata thus was a syllabus of 10 techniques, that is all, and so was katame-no-kata. Moreover they are called “randori-no-kata” hence emphasizing their close relationship and application to randori. So please, when in trying to understand Kanō’s idea, for once and for all drop this misconception of demonstrative ceremonial exercises which has nothing to do with the concept, and do not blame Kanō for the lack of understanding in later generations. We inherited this misunderstanding from our first Western jūdō pioneers, not from Kanō.

The only caveat that needs to be made is that 130 years have passed since Kōdōkan jūdō was created, and that has led to two developments which are important here, i.e. an enormous improvement in protection materials, and an enormous improvement of injury treatment and prophylaxis. Because of those developments it is true, that probably certain things that 130 years ago were only safe to practice in the form of kata, today, can be practiced reasonably safe and with less serious consequences in the form of randori. However, even that cannot be concluded as a blanket statement as in recent history the contrary has taken place. For example, a technique such as kani-basami which I practiced during most of my career in jūdō in randori (and shiai) without injury, now has become prohibited in shiai (it isn’t prohibited in randori just like daki-age or uki-gatame are not prohibited in randori, unless the club where you practice follows the rationale that things that are not allowed in shiai for insurance reasons or for whatever are locally not permitted doing randori either). Nevertheless, that only shows that a large majority in jūdō seems to be taken the opposite view, and is essentially saying that even those techniques today have been moved from randori and can only be performed as kata, meaning I am telling you beforehand I am going to do kani-basami, so you know to give way (unlike Yamashita against Endo, in the infamous contest that led to the abolition of kani-basami, and thus where it was Yamashita himself who was responsible for the injury, not Endo) and prepare to do ukemi.

<_<

If I am doing "win," sloppy and sissy is fine; if I am doing Judo, beautiful is my rule and goal. Judo is far more important and rewarding than "win."

"What you are as a person is far more important than what you are as a basketball [Judo] player." --John Wooden 1910-2010

"You should first try to negotiate nicely but you can be strong after there's resistance, and know, just like in judo, when to catch them." --Rusty Kanokogi, 2008, on negotiating.
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#14 User is offline   Ben Reinhardt 

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Posted 22 October 2011 - 02:20 AM

I found that when I told my students that nage no kata is just another training method, a special proscribed drill for throwing, and as such is not a big deal, they loosened up quite a bit and actually enjoy practice now. I also told them "you already know how to throw, so what's the big deal? You know where uke will be when and what he will be doing, it can't get much easier than that".
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#15 User is offline   Jonesy 

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Posted 23 October 2011 - 07:12 AM

My views on this are simple.

Mandate kata for all dan promotions up to 8 dan, with a different kata for each dan.

Mandate coaches to maintain a coaching log - and over a 12 month period, If 25% of class time has not been spent on kata, then no retaliation of coaching award.

A "carrott" approach is doomed to fail as attitudes are so entrenched, so a (big) "stick" approach is needed instead.
Dr Llyr C Jones
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