JudoForum.com: Should I continue practicing judo? - JudoForum.com

Jump to content

Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

Should I continue practicing judo? Rate Topic: -----

#1 User is offline   Mindless 

  • View blog
  • Group: Full Members
  • Posts: 4
  • Joined: 25-November 10

Posted 25 November 2010 - 05:57 AM

I've been doing judo for a couple months now, and even got promoted to yellow belt last week. I really like judo, but the problem is: I have joint hypermobility and dysautonomia (which is similar to being prone to sudden blood pressure drops). Even if I'm pretty limited after practice because of being exhausted and in pain (which I presume happens to every judoka, but is increased with this kind of disease) what bothers me the most is that during and after intense (and sometimes even not so intense) uchi-komi or randori I get really dizzy, to the point where I would faint if I didn't get rest immediately.

I've learned to kind of deal with it, and also the dizziness has been disappearing (which makes sense because staying in shape is one of the main "treatments"). I thought everything was perfect, but yesterday, after my first shiai match (it was a small, beginners only one), I almost passed out.

The question is: Does any of you suffer from any muscular o heart disease? I'm just wondering if someone else had health problems which made judo training and competition really hard, but finally got over them. Even if competition ends being too much for me, I'd be satisfied with just being able to train without too much pain.


Sorry if something like this has been asked before.
0

#2 User is offline   stacey 

  • damnum absque injuria
  • Icon
  • View blog
  • Group: Special Members
  • Posts: 13,920
  • Joined: 28-August 06

Posted 25 November 2010 - 06:09 AM

when it comes to diseases and conditions and whether you should do judo, you really need to consult with a competent physician. Assuming you're cleared by that physician, then it's really up to you to weigh the pros and cons of what you're doing to determine if you're getting everything you want out of it without sacrificing too much.

I'm not a physician, just a judo practitioner. I'll say this, everybody starts out sore, and I mean sore in ways they never knew could happen. It gradually disappears in time. The older you are, the harder it is to get out of bed the morning after a good practice.

Now, in as far as heart/blood pressure problems, you are not alone. I get orthostatic hypotension all the time, whether I'm doing judo or just getting up out of a chair. I know that sense of getting so dizzy that you gray out and feel like you're going to faint. I've even fainted on occasion. It's usually a scarier experience for those watching than it is for me. All I can say is that for me, judo is worth it. Heck, I'm going to get dizzy anyway, might as well be doing something I like to do. The key is to understand your symptoms and take a break when you need to. You don't need to do everything that everybody else is doing - you just need to do enough to grow your own judo. You do it at your own rate and with your own constraints and limitations, as well as your own talents. There is no point doing something until you pass out. Shiai is a high stress event, so it's only natural that you get "bad" then - these things tend to get aggravated by stress. You can mitigate it by dealing with your own performance anxiety. Getting through your first shiai is a good start. Giving yourself permission to sit out when you're on the verge of passing out would also be good. If you can use that sit out time to calm down, and center yourself, even better.

Talk a bit about this with your sensei. Your sensei needs to know what to do if you should pass out, and may have more recommendations for you.

So, you are not the only one. However, you are the only you. Make the decision that you need to make for you.

BTW, congrats on the belt. Welcome to judo and welcome to the Forum! Enjoy your journey!
Disclaimer


Please note, the above provided information does not constitute legal advice but is written for entertainment purposes only. The author is not responsible should you pursue any of the above, and by reading the above, you agree to hold the author, the forum, and any and all other entity including but not limited to God harmless for any damage, monetary or otherwise, caused by your pursuit. Yadda Yadda....
0

#3 User is offline   Cichorei Kano 

  • Judo Forum Hachidan
  • Icon
  • Group: Special Members
  • Posts: 19,252
  • Joined: 29-January 06

Posted 25 November 2010 - 06:34 AM

View PostMindless, on 25 November 2010 - 02:57 PM, said:

I've been doing judo for a couple months now, and even got promoted to yellow belt last week. I really like judo, but the problem is: I have joint hypermobility and dysautonomia (which is similar to being prone to sudden blood pressure drops). Even if I'm pretty limited after practice because of being exhausted and in pain (which I presume happens to every judoka, but is increased with this kind of disease) what bothers me the most is that during and after intense (and sometimes even not so intense) uchi-komi or randori I get really dizzy, to the point where I would faint if I didn't get rest immediately.

I've learned to kind of deal with it, and also the dizziness has been disappearing (which makes sense because staying in shape is one of the main "treatments"). I thought everything was perfect, but yesterday, after my first shiai match (it was a small, beginners only one), I almost passed out.

The question is: Does any of you suffer from any muscular o heart disease? I'm just wondering if someone else had health problems which made judo training and competition really hard, but finally got over them. Even if competition ends being too much for me, I'd be satisfied with just being able to train without too much pain.


Sorry if something like this has been asked before.


Without knowing your gender and age it is difficult to write anything else in addition to Stacey's reply.
"The world is a republic of mediocrities, and always was." (Thomas Carlyle)
"Nothing is as approved as mediocrity, the majority has established it and it fixes it fangs on whatever gets beyond it either way." (Blaise Pascal)
"Quand on essaie, c'est difficile. Quand on n'essaie pas, c'est impossible" (Guess Who ?)
"I am never wrong. Once I thought I was, and that was a mistake."
0

#4 User is offline   Mindless 

  • View blog
  • Group: Full Members
  • Posts: 4
  • Joined: 25-November 10

Posted 25 November 2010 - 01:01 PM

View Poststacey, on 25 November 2010 - 06:09 AM, said:

when it comes to diseases and conditions and whether you should do judo, you really need to consult with a competent physician. Assuming you're cleared by that physician, then it's really up to you to weigh the pros and cons of what you're doing to determine if you're getting everything you want out of it without sacrificing too much.

I'm not a physician, just a judo practitioner. I'll say this, everybody starts out sore, and I mean sore in ways they never knew could happen. It gradually disappears in time. The older you are, the harder it is to get out of bed the morning after a good practice.

Now, in as far as heart/blood pressure problems, you are not alone. I get orthostatic hypotension all the time, whether I'm doing judo or just getting up out of a chair. I know that sense of getting so dizzy that you gray out and feel like you're going to faint. I've even fainted on occasion. It's usually a scarier experience for those watching than it is for me. All I can say is that for me, judo is worth it. Heck, I'm going to get dizzy anyway, might as well be doing something I like to do. The key is to understand your symptoms and take a break when you need to. You don't need to do everything that everybody else is doing - you just need to do enough to grow your own judo. You do it at your own rate and with your own constraints and limitations, as well as your own talents. There is no point doing something until you pass out. Shiai is a high stress event, so it's only natural that you get "bad" then - these things tend to get aggravated by stress. You can mitigate it by dealing with your own performance anxiety. Getting through your first shiai is a good start. Giving yourself permission to sit out when you're on the verge of passing out would also be good. If you can use that sit out time to calm down, and center yourself, even better.

Talk a bit about this with your sensei. Your sensei needs to know what to do if you should pass out, and may have more recommendations for you.

So, you are not the only one. However, you are the only you. Make the decision that you need to make for you.

BTW, congrats on the belt. Welcome to judo and welcome to the Forum! Enjoy your journey!


Thanks for the welcome and the advices. I think judo's worth it for me too. I've tried other sports/activities before, but this is the first time I've been so committed and enthusiastic about it.

View PostCichorei Kano, on 25 November 2010 - 06:34 AM, said:

Without knowing your gender and age it is difficult to write anything else in addition to Stacey's reply.



I'm a 19 years old male.
0

#5 User is offline   Cichorei Kano 

  • Judo Forum Hachidan
  • Icon
  • Group: Special Members
  • Posts: 19,252
  • Joined: 29-January 06

Posted 25 November 2010 - 03:24 PM

View PostMindless, on 25 November 2010 - 10:01 PM, said:

Thanks for the welcome and the advices. I think judo's worth it for me too. I've tried other sports/activities before, but this is the first time I've been so committed and enthusiastic about it.

I'm a 19 years old male.


What is your body mass and height and how long have you had these problems ?
"The world is a republic of mediocrities, and always was." (Thomas Carlyle)
"Nothing is as approved as mediocrity, the majority has established it and it fixes it fangs on whatever gets beyond it either way." (Blaise Pascal)
"Quand on essaie, c'est difficile. Quand on n'essaie pas, c'est impossible" (Guess Who ?)
"I am never wrong. Once I thought I was, and that was a mistake."
0

#6 User is offline   Mindless 

  • View blog
  • Group: Full Members
  • Posts: 4
  • Joined: 25-November 10

Posted 25 November 2010 - 04:09 PM

View PostCichorei Kano, on 25 November 2010 - 03:24 PM, said:

What is your body mass and height and how long have you had these problems ?


I'm 5'7" and weigh around 170 lbs. I've had these problems for two o three years now.
0

#7 User is offline   young contrarian 

  • Judo Forum Ikkyu
  • Icon
  • Group: Special Members
  • Posts: 392
  • Joined: 21-May 09

Posted 25 November 2010 - 06:18 PM

i don't think i have a cardiovascular problem like you, (well, i do run out of air very easily, i always have, even when i was in pretty good physical shape. and i did almost pass out after my first shiai) but i certainly do have a case of joint laxity. hereditary, as my mom's just like me, and i wouldn't be surprised if my daughter joined a circus when she grows up. i can bend like gumby, which a lot of judoka i trained with were quite jealous of, and i also thought pretty cool, but now that i'm encroaching my mid 30s, it's affecting my quality of life. there isn't a joint in my body that does not ache, whether i am active or not.

even though i never had major knee injuries, my knees are so wobbly, a rheumatologist told me that if i intend to go out WALKING for more than an hour, i should have knee braces on. it's depressing.

i honestly fear that every single time i go out training, it might be my last.

and i still do judo. well, try to, at least.
it's worth it.
0

#8 User is offline   Judokaloca 

  • Judo Forum Sankyu
  • Icon
  • Group: Special Members
  • Posts: 231
  • Joined: 30-June 05

Posted 25 November 2010 - 07:20 PM

Ask your doctor.
"It is not the critic who counts: not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles or where the doer of deeds could have done better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly, who errs and comes up short again and again, because there is no effort without error or shortcoming, but who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions, who spends himself for a worthy cause; who, at the best, knows, in the end, the triumph of high achievement, and who, at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who knew neither victory nor defeat."-Theodore Roosevelt
0

#9 User is offline   Mindless 

  • View blog
  • Group: Full Members
  • Posts: 4
  • Joined: 25-November 10

Posted 13 December 2010 - 10:46 PM

As an update, after visiting a doctor, I was told I should try to avoid activities like judo. However, if it meant I would stop doing physical exercise frequently (which is pretty much the case) I could continue practicing it, but keeping in mind that I should stop if I see I get injured often. Also, I should rest whenever I feel dizzy and, obviously, Shiai is completely out of the question.
1

#10 User is offline   stacey 

  • damnum absque injuria
  • Icon
  • View blog
  • Group: Special Members
  • Posts: 13,920
  • Joined: 28-August 06

Posted 13 December 2010 - 11:31 PM

so, that means you're sticking with it? Cool!
Disclaimer


Please note, the above provided information does not constitute legal advice but is written for entertainment purposes only. The author is not responsible should you pursue any of the above, and by reading the above, you agree to hold the author, the forum, and any and all other entity including but not limited to God harmless for any damage, monetary or otherwise, caused by your pursuit. Yadda Yadda....
0

#11 User is offline   footsweep 

  • Judo Forum Nikyu
  • Icon
  • Group: Special Members
  • Posts: 367
  • Joined: 10-December 06

Posted 14 December 2010 - 03:09 AM

I hope you continue judo. And I hope the practice will make you stronger, improving your condition. Best of luck.
0

#12 User is offline   DavidB 

  • Judo Forum Nikyu
  • Icon
  • Group: Special Members
  • Posts: 271
  • Joined: 19-November 08

Posted 16 December 2010 - 04:26 PM

Remember, even if your physician recommends that you not compete in Judo or you decide on your own not to compete in Judo, that does not mean you cannot keep training in Judo. Talk with your physician to see exactly what they think the range of your activities can and should be and how you can adapt your training to the needs of your body. I have met people who train in Judo who have heart conditions and other health problems but they limit themselves as needed. Shiai is just one part of Judo, not the end all of Judo. Much as some people would love the world to think. :-) If Shiai is out, maybe you can consider getting involved in kata competitions. It will give you something to focus on and help you stay motivated to improve your Judo.

Dave

PS Also remember it is always a good idea to get a second and or third opinion from other doctors. Some or all may agree on your prognosis but there is a possibility that the doctor you are seeing does not know a lot about Judo.
http://www.Kiva.org where a little help goes a long way.
0

Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic