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#1 User is offline   Tom123 

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 09:15 PM

Hi

I've been doing Tomiki aikido for a couple of years and wish to also start practising judo as soon as my knee has recovered from an imminent operation. Evidently, many of the Tomiki (Randori no Kata) basic techniques are taken from the Kodokan Goshin Jutsu Kata, which he created or contributed to. I've watched the kata done on Youtube and recognised several of the techniques eg, ushiro ate, waki gatame, hiki taoshi etc (sorry - I'm not sure if these techniques have different names in judo).

I kind of get the impression, however, that the Goshin Jutsu Kata is rather peripheral to mainstream judo. Is this the case? Would most Yudansha instantly recognise these Tomiki aikido techniques as being part of their own discipline? I looked up the BJA dan grading syllabus and there didn't appear to any mention of the kata there.

Would these techniques be inappropriate in judo randori? I hasten to say that I don't really want to draw too much attention to my aikido background in the interest of keeping a low profile!! There are Tomiki aikido techniques that clearly wouldn't be appropriate, especially ones that involve throwing with the wrist (eg kote gaeshi), but what about those named above?

I would be very grateful for any comments

Thanks

Martin
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#2 User is offline   Jonesy 

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 09:55 PM

Martin

Welcome. I am afraid to report that most BJA dan grade holders would not recognise the Kodokan Goshin Jutsu as being anything at all to do with judo. As you have correctly identified it does not feature in any of the BJA promotion requirements which are limited to a rudimentary understanding of the Nage- and Katame-no-Kata for the Competitive dan grade promotion route, with only the addition of the non-Kodokan approved Gonosen-no-Kata for the Technical Promotion route. All three of these kata are constrained to techniques (with the exception of ashi-garami in the Katame-no-Kata) that would be familiar to contest judo players. Kodokan Goshin Jutsu is but one of a treasure trove of Kodokan kata that are ignored by the mainstream BJA.

In general, the BJA pays little attention beyond lip service to kata though there is a recently established Kata Commission composed of very knowledgeable people. I myself know the Kodokan Goshin Jutsu and have taught it on many occasions. There is also an old BJA publication called Kodokan Goshin Jutsu written by a senior UK judoka/aikidoka John Cornish (who trained under Tomiki-sensei) though I suspect it is out of print and you would have to look on eBay for it.

As to what techniques from the Kodokan Goshin Jutsu you could use in judo contest/randori, well very few. The ude gatame armlock is allowed, as is osoto-otoshi, waki gatame and hadaka jime. Nothing else.
Dr Llyr C Jones
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#3 User is offline   Tafftaz 

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 11:45 PM

I agree with jonesy to an extent, but I honestly believe that there is a kata revolution happening in the UK at the moment. It is still very low key but I honestly believe that more and more people are starting to show an interest. The last two kata courses that we held (Nage no Kata and Goshin Jutsu) were very well attended. I had to cap the numbers wanting to attend the Goshin Jutsu due to not enough mat space ( and we have a large mat area).

This post has been edited by Tafftaz: 27 September 2010 - 11:45 PM

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#4 User is offline   Jonesy 

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 06:57 AM

I will agree and disagree with Tafftaz. Yes there are more people in the UK doing kata, but the motivation for 99% of those folks is to enter kata competitions to try and win a medal or to pass a theory element of a promotion exam. They do not think at all about how kata training benefits their all round judo or develops them in other ways, they are only concerned about being able to adhere to a marking scheme to minimise mistakes and hence win a medal. I hasten to say though that Tafftaz is not one of those people.

There are others who studied kata before it became a competitive event, see its proper place in a balanced judo curriculum and have deep knowledge.

I will believe the BJA about kata when it puts all the Kodokan kata into its promotion syllabus for both Contest and Technical promotions. When it is no 8 dan promotion without Koshiki no Kata we will have got somewhere.

Did you know that it was the British Kata Championships the week before last? There is not a write up nor any results posted on the BJA website! That to me reveals how far they have really come, and I am not even a great fan of kata tournaments.
Dr Llyr C Jones
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#5 User is offline   Tom123 

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 08:18 PM

Hi

Thanks for the replies, especially Jonesy for your very informative response. Maybe Tomiki aikido and judo have less common ground than I thought; the biggest similarity is obviously the competition element of the two disciplines (in which, as you are no doubt aware, Tomiki differs from other styles of aikido). Significantly, many Tomiki teachers are accomplished judo men who I guess are attracted by the competitive aspect of the style.

Anyway, I'm very much looking forward to my judo debut, despite having seen the size of some of the club members!

Thanks

Martin
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#6 User is offline   Tafftaz 

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 08:29 PM

Jonesy, I see your point. Maybe I was getting a little ahead of myself.

Tom123, don,t worry about the size. Size of a training partner is just a state of mind.

This post has been edited by Tafftaz: 28 September 2010 - 08:30 PM

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#7 User is offline   Daniel.H 

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 02:57 AM

Hi Martin and All,

I've been a very quiet member here thus far. I really enjoy reading all the threads, but have not really felt compelled to add my two cents until now. Thank you all for this most entertaining and informative distraction.

I do both judo and Tomiki aikido. Tomiki aikido for about six years now and Judo for around four. When I first saw the KGK I recognized many of the techniques. I still haven't started learning it yet, so my knowledge is limited.... and not really needed as Jonsey answered your question above. I thought instead I might share some of the similarities in techniques I've found between the two.

In the beginning there weren't many techniques that crossed over for me, mostly fundamentals like ukemi, taisabaki, kuzushi, tsukuri and kake(The later of which was a tremendous help when learning new throws). However, having done a lot of kansetsu-waza in aikido helped when learning some of the katame-waza mostly ude-garami and waki-gatame. Both of these techniques can be used to take your opponent to the tatami so you can go into osae-komi, but I would advise waiting awhile and asking your teacher about them before you start using them in your club. Two other waza I noticed, that are almost identical, are sumi-otoshi and hiki-otoshi. I have never thrown anyone with either of these two throws in judo randori(not from a lack of trying). I find them both very difficult to do on a resisting opponent. But on the other hand, in aikido, I throw people frequently with sumi-otoshi (and less, much less frequently with hiki-toshi). The few times I have tried to use sumi-otoshi in judo it wound up looking more like a tani-otoshi. Eventually, I decided to shelve these two techniques and concentrate on more basic techniques, but I've not given up on them. Someday, I hope to be able to use them effectively in randori.

Over all, I have thoroughly enjoyed practicing both judo and Tomiki aikido. They almost seem as though they were meant to be taught together. I'd be really interested in hearing other people's experiences and or opinions on this subject.

Good luck with your operation and your debut, Martin.

Daniel
Regards
Daniel.H
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M.X
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#8 User is offline   johan smits 

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 09:25 AM

View PostDaniel.H, on 29 September 2010 - 03:57 AM, said:

Hi Martin and All,

I've been a very quiet member here thus far. I really enjoy reading all the threads, but have not really felt compelled to add my two cents until now. Thank you all for this most entertaining and informative distraction.

I do both judo and Tomiki aikido. Tomiki aikido for about six years now and Judo for around four. When I first saw the KGK I recognized many of the techniques. I still haven't started learning it yet, so my knowledge is limited.... and not really needed as Jonsey answered your question above. I thought instead I might share some of the similarities in techniques I've found between the two.

In the beginning there weren't many techniques that crossed over for me, mostly fundamentals like ukemi, taisabaki, kuzushi, tsukuri and kake(The later of which was a tremendous help when learning new throws). However, having done a lot of kansetsu-waza in aikido helped when learning some of the katame-waza mostly ude-garami and waki-gatame. Both of these techniques can be used to take your opponent to the tatami so you can go into osae-komi, but I would advise waiting awhile and asking your teacher about them before you start using them in your club. Two other waza I noticed, that are almost identical, are sumi-otoshi and hiki-otoshi. I have never thrown anyone with either of these two throws in judo randori(not from a lack of trying). I find them both very difficult to do on a resisting opponent. But on the other hand, in aikido, I throw people frequently with sumi-otoshi (and less, much less frequently with hiki-toshi). The few times I have tried to use sumi-otoshi in judo it wound up looking more like a tani-otoshi. Eventually, I decided to shelve these two techniques and concentrate on more basic techniques, but I've not given up on them. Someday, I hope to be able to use them effectively in randori.

Over all, I have thoroughly enjoyed practicing both judo and Tomiki aikido. They almost seem as though they were meant to be taught together. I'd be really interested in hearing other people's experiences and or opinions on this subject.

Good luck with your operation and your debut, Martin.

Daniel



Tomiki aikido and Nihon jujutsu have a lot in common. From memory - NBK - has posted on this subject either on this board or on E-budo.

Happy landings,

Johan
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#9 User is offline   Daniel.H 

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 01:33 PM

View Postjohan smits, on 29 September 2010 - 06:25 PM, said:

Tomiki aikido and Nihon jujutsu have a lot in common. From memory - NBK - has posted on this subject either on this board or on E-budo.

Happy landings,

Johan


Thanks Johan,

I'll take a look through the older posts over the next couple of days.

Daniel
Regards
Daniel.H
Stumbling is not falling.
M.X
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#10 User is offline   Tom123 

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Posted 02 October 2010 - 04:52 PM

Daniel-thanks for the insight and Johan - thanks, I'll check it out.

Found out today my 8 year old son's entering his first judo tournament in three weeks time. Fingers crossed!

Martin
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#11 User is offline   NBK 

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Posted 03 October 2010 - 12:03 AM

View Postjohan smits, on 29 September 2010 - 06:25 PM, said:

Tomiki aikido and Nihon jujutsu have a lot in common. From memory - NBK - has posted on this subject either on this board or on E-budo.

Happy landings,

Johan

I think it is fair to say that Kodokan Goshinjutsu is 'under appreciated' in Japan. <_< Most judoka seem to find it ineffective, which is hardly surprising given that the term kuzushi doesn't appear once in the kata instructional manual and I have never once heard the term used by anyone teaching it in the Kodokan despite months of attending the classes. And kuzushi is key to the effective execution of this kata.

It comes into play at 5th dan promotions here, but the judoka has the choice of KGJ or kime no kata - my impression is that most judoka, if their knees are up to it, will go with kime no kata.

I'm working on an English translation of a new Japanese book on kime no kata by one of the top instructors of Tomiki ryu aikido, someone who knew Tomiki sensei very well and practiced this and other techniques under and with Tomiki sensei for decades; it should be an eye opener.

And, yes, the basic techniques of Nihon Jujutsu in large part derive from Tomiki's / Ueshiba Morihei's prewar aikibujutsu, and Tomiki's postwar early 'aikido' instruction in the Kodokan Strategic Air Command (SAC) Combatives instruction course; Sato Shizuya, the founder of Nihon Jujutsu, was Tomiki's teaching assistant in those aikido classes, and incorporated much of it into his curriculum. It is described below and on this website www.nihonjujutsu.com .


Just yesterday one of the senior Tomiki ryu guys joined us in the US Embassy Tokyo Judo club for some explorations of ashi waza. All recognize the links and close similarities between the arts, but the flowery bits were lopped off in Nihon Jujutsu, as we try to keep the movements as sparse and direct as possible.

"
Nihon Jujutsu - Technical and Philosophical Origins

The philosophical basis of Nihon Jujutsu can be found in the Japanese axiom, 精力善用自他協栄(seiryoku zenyo jitakyôei), which can be read “Commit oneself to maximum efficiency, and mutual benefit in all endeavors.” This phrase, first coined by Kano Jigoro, the founder of Kodokan judo, refers both to applications of the physical art during training, and to the larger philosophical concept of utilizing budo as a catalyst for personal growth.

Concisely, “maximum efficiency” in training allows one to apply techniques before an opponent has a chance to react and overcome opposition with a minimum of force. “Mutual benefit in all endeavors,” as applied to practice in the dojo, serves as a guiding principle that permits all practitioners to train rigorously without undue injury. Common examples can be found in kendo, judo, karatedo, and many other martial arts where participants agree to abide by specific rules of conduct in order to ensure a safe training environment.

At a speech at the University of Southern California (USC) in 1932, on the occasion of 11th Olympiad, Kano Jigoro had the following to say about the application of ‘committing oneself to maximum efficiency, and mutual benefit in all endeavors’ in every day life:


    Upon careful observation of the world today, despite the myriad of moral instruction found in various religions, philosophies, and traditions, all intended to improve mans’ moral character, there can be no doubt that strife is found at all levels of society.

    This state of affairs clearly indicates that society lacks a means to promote harmony and positively influence the lives of men and women everywhere. However, I believe the philosophy of ‘maximum efficiency and mutual benefit and welfare’ contains an ideal with which people everywhere could remodel society in such a way as to inspire greater cooperation and satisfaction throughout the world.

Nihon Jujutsu can be said to embody the spirit of Kano Jigoro’s philosophy of building a moral society through the practice and teaching of budo. Specifically, through physical training practitioners cultivate methods for controlling opponents, and thereby learn principles and techniques for overcoming adversity in everyday life. The underlying theme is that negative results are minimized through the application of a rational and flexible response to all situations.

According to the founder, Sato Shizuya, “the philosophy of seiryoku zenyo jitakyôei is both practical, and appropriate for modern life. In ancient, or earlier times, the methods of bujutsu, techniques developed primarily for the elimination of an opponent by whatever needs necessary, may have been relevant only for members of the military or law enforcement agencies. Whereas, Nihon Jujutsu is a system based on respect for one’s fellow man, for the community as a whole and is truly a method of living with one another in a modern world.”

The core curriculum of Nihon Jujutsu incorporates the practical, decisive throwing, choking, and immobilization methods of judo; the entering and striking of aikibujutsu; the restraining techniques of taihojutsu; and the taisabaki (evasive movement), open hand, and armed self-defense principles expounded by Dr. Tomiki Kenji.


The Influence of Dr. Tomiki Kenji

Tomiki began judo in high school, receiving shodan (first-degree black belt) in 1919. He later began studying aikibujutsu, as Ueshiba Morihei originally called his art, as Ueshiba’s personal student at the original Kobukan dojo in Tokyo in 1926. Tomiki was awarded the world’s first aikido 8th dan in 1940 during a visit by Ueshiba to Manchuria (then known as ‘Manchukuo’).

The phrase 体体剣 (karada tai ken), or ‘body as a sword’, first coined by Dr. Tomiki in 1937, was a revolutionary concept in its succinct definition of the aikibujutsu ideal of using the body as a weapon. This phrase became the basis of his lifelong investigation of the ways and means of budo and its application to practical methods of self-defense. During his tenure in Manchukuo 1934 – 1945, Tomiki was first a Professor at Daido Gakuin (a Manchukuo government official training college), and later also at Kenkoku University, the country’s premier college. Additionally during this period, he taught aikibujutsu to the Military Police of the Imperial Japanese Kwantung Army.

Though he was interred by the Soviets for three years after WWII, Tomiki continued his studies of budo. Upon his return to Japan in 1948, he joined the Kodokan as a part-time secretary, where he continued his study of judo and aikido. He practiced aikido one on one with Sato Shizuya from 1948 – 1951. When Tomiki became the aikido director of the Kodokan’s Strategic Air Command (SAC) martial arts program (1952 – 1956), Sato became the assistant aikido instructor, and remained so for the duration of the program.

Additionally, Tomiki Sensei is credited with leading the development committee of the Kodokan Goshin-jutsu (forms of self-defense) in 1956. Ultimately, Tomiki retired as Professor Emeritus of Physical Education at Waseda University, Tokyo, and founded the Japan Aikido Association, the capstone organization for Shodokan aikido (‘Tomiki ryu aikido’), now practiced worldwide.

Until mid-WWII, aikibujutsu hand-to-hand combat instruction (as directed by Ueshiba Morihei, and Tomiki Kenji, in Japan and Manchuria, respectively, as well as other instructors) comprised the core of combatives training for elite Imperial Japanese military personnel. During this period, the fundamental methods of aikibutsu, Kodokan goshin jutsu, and aikido were refined and compiled.

While Tomiki taught the Imperial military in Manchuria, Ueshiba Morihei directed training in Tokyo at the Toyama School (Army officer training school), the Nakano School (site of the famous Army intelligence officers’ program), and at the Navy School officer candidate school in Etajima.

The full curriculum of the Japanese Imperial military officers’ combatives training focused on 4 unarmed and armed martial arts:

- Aikibujutsu (Ueshiba and Tomiki’s early Daitoryu aikijujutsu-based martial arts)
- Tankenjutsu basic techniques (use of the short sword/bayonet)
- Kenjutsu basic techniques (Toyama ryu battojutsu)
- Jukenjutsu basic techniques (Japanese Imperial Army rifle bayonet training, incorporating both ancient
Japanese spear methods and modern European bayonet techniques)

All of these arts are still accessible today from the following organizations:

- Nihon Jujutsu - as taught at the U.S Embassy Tokyo Judo Club and affiliated clubs
- Tankenjutsu - sword-bayonet basic techniques, All Japan Jukendo Federation
- Toyama ryu iaido - taught by several organizations based in Japan
- Jukendo - rifle bayonet basic techniques, All Japan Jukendo Federation


The Kodokan and SAC

Meanwhile, during WWII, the Kodokan emphasized self-defense techniques over the sporting and spiritual aspects of judo; there also was a special self-defense kata developed for women during this period called joshi goshinho. The focus changed again after WWII largely to focus on sporting competition and eliminate the controversial self-defense aspects likely to draw negative attention from the Occupation authorities.

In 1952, the U.S. Air Force Strategic Air Command (SAC) sent two initial groups of airmen to the Kodokan to study judo, karatedo, aikido, and police techniques. This program was expanded through 1956, and by its end hundreds of U.S. Air Force martial arts instructors had trained under Sato sensei, who instructed both aikido (under head aikido instructor Tomiki) and taihojutsu techniques (under taihojutsu head instructor and senior Tokyo Metropolitan Police taihojutsu / judo instructor Hosokawa Kusuo). Other notable instructors included such Shotokan karatedo legends such as Funakoshi Gichin, Nakayama Masatoshi, Obata lsao, and Nishiyama Hidetaka.

In the early 1950’s, Sato sensei began teaching judo and self-defense at U.S. military facilities around Tokyo. In 1957, Sato sensei founded the U.S. Embassy Judo Club where he continued to develop and refine the techniques that ultimately evolved into Nihon Jujutsu.

During the same period, Tomiki sensei led the Kodokan committee that developed the Kodokan goshinjutsu series of techniques, an advanced self-defense curriculum. Interestingly, Nihon Jujutsu and Kodokan goshinjutsu feature many similar techniques, which is unsurprising given their extensive common roots in traditional jujutsu, judo, taihojutsu, and aikibujutsu.

The techniques and philosophy of Nihon Jujutsu represents the culmination of historical and modern development in gendai budo, the rational review of past practice in light of a changing world, and the preservation of traditions that form the core of budo.

The evolution of this system began before 1868, during the Edo era (1603 – 1868) in bujutsu schools, continued with the establishment of modern Japan, and culminated in the development of contemporary arts such as judo, aikibujutsu, aikido, and taihojutsu. Technical and philosophical developments during the 1930s and 1940s by premier judoka and aikidoka, imparted to Sato-Sensei during the early post-WWII years still comprise the essence of Nihon Jujutsu today. While the future of Nihon Jujutsu can be found in the hearts, minds, and bodies of Sato-Sensei’s direct students, and Nihon Jujutsu enthusiasts the world over.
””

We get students from around the world who seek to find a nice balance between judo and jujutsu techniques. Just recently a young lady from Austria joined us. Later this month we have a group of German judoka coming to practice nage ura waza no kata, one of Sato sensei's specialties.

http://www.usejc.com/




柔能制剛 - 弱能制強
黄石公三略 上略
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#12 User is offline   johan smits 

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Posted 03 October 2010 - 08:52 PM

View PostNBK, on 03 October 2010 - 01:03 AM, said:

I think it is fair to say that Kodokan Goshinjutsu is 'under appreciated' in Japan. <_< Most judoka seem to find it ineffective, which is hardly surprising given that the term kuzushi doesn't appear once in the kata instructional manual and I have never once heard the term used by anyone teaching it in the Kodokan despite months of attending the classes. And kuzushi is key to the effective execution of this kata.

It comes into play at 5th dan promotions here, but the judoka has the choice of KGJ or kime no kata - my impression is that most judoka, if their knees are up to it, will go with kime no kata.

I'm working on an English translation of a new Japanese book on kime no kata by one of the top instructors of Tomiki ryu aikido, someone who knew Tomiki sensei very well and practiced this and other techniques under and with Tomiki sensei for decades; it should be an eye opener.

And, yes, the basic techniques of Nihon Jujutsu in large part derive from Tomiki's / Ueshiba Morihei's prewar aikibujutsu, and Tomiki's postwar early 'aikido' instruction in the Kodokan Strategic Air Command (SAC) Combatives instruction course; Sato Shizuya, the founder of Nihon Jujutsu, was Tomiki's teaching assistant in those aikido classes, and incorporated much of it into his curriculum. It is described below and on this website www.nihonjujutsu.com .


Just yesterday one of the senior Tomiki ryu guys joined us in the US Embassy Tokyo Judo club for some explorations of ashi waza. All recognize the links and close similarities between the arts, but the flowery bits were lopped off in Nihon Jujutsu, as we try to keep the movements as sparse and direct as possible.

"
Nihon Jujutsu - Technical and Philosophical Origins

The philosophical basis of Nihon Jujutsu can be found in the Japanese axiom, 精力善用自他協栄(seiryoku zenyo jitakyôei), which can be read “Commit oneself to maximum efficiency, and mutual benefit in all endeavors.” This phrase, first coined by Kano Jigoro, the founder of Kodokan judo, refers both to applications of the physical art during training, and to the larger philosophical concept of utilizing budo as a catalyst for personal growth.

Concisely, “maximum efficiency” in training allows one to apply techniques before an opponent has a chance to react and overcome opposition with a minimum of force. “Mutual benefit in all endeavors,” as applied to practice in the dojo, serves as a guiding principle that permits all practitioners to train rigorously without undue injury. Common examples can be found in kendo, judo, karatedo, and many other martial arts where participants agree to abide by specific rules of conduct in order to ensure a safe training environment.

At a speech at the University of Southern California (USC) in 1932, on the occasion of 11th Olympiad, Kano Jigoro had the following to say about the application of ‘committing oneself to maximum efficiency, and mutual benefit in all endeavors’ in every day life:


    Upon careful observation of the world today, despite the myriad of moral instruction found in various religions, philosophies, and traditions, all intended to improve mans’ moral character, there can be no doubt that strife is found at all levels of society.

    This state of affairs clearly indicates that society lacks a means to promote harmony and positively influence the lives of men and women everywhere. However, I believe the philosophy of ‘maximum efficiency and mutual benefit and welfare’ contains an ideal with which people everywhere could remodel society in such a way as to inspire greater cooperation and satisfaction throughout the world.

Nihon Jujutsu can be said to embody the spirit of Kano Jigoro’s philosophy of building a moral society through the practice and teaching of budo. Specifically, through physical training practitioners cultivate methods for controlling opponents, and thereby learn principles and techniques for overcoming adversity in everyday life. The underlying theme is that negative results are minimized through the application of a rational and flexible response to all situations.

According to the founder, Sato Shizuya, “the philosophy of seiryoku zenyo jitakyôei is both practical, and appropriate for modern life. In ancient, or earlier times, the methods of bujutsu, techniques developed primarily for the elimination of an opponent by whatever needs necessary, may have been relevant only for members of the military or law enforcement agencies. Whereas, Nihon Jujutsu is a system based on respect for one’s fellow man, for the community as a whole and is truly a method of living with one another in a modern world.”

The core curriculum of Nihon Jujutsu incorporates the practical, decisive throwing, choking, and immobilization methods of judo; the entering and striking of aikibujutsu; the restraining techniques of taihojutsu; and the taisabaki (evasive movement), open hand, and armed self-defense principles expounded by Dr. Tomiki Kenji.


The Influence of Dr. Tomiki Kenji

Tomiki began judo in high school, receiving shodan (first-degree black belt) in 1919. He later began studying aikibujutsu, as Ueshiba Morihei originally called his art, as Ueshiba’s personal student at the original Kobukan dojo in Tokyo in 1926. Tomiki was awarded the world’s first aikido 8th dan in 1940 during a visit by Ueshiba to Manchuria (then known as ‘Manchukuo’).

The phrase 体体剣 (karada tai ken), or ‘body as a sword’, first coined by Dr. Tomiki in 1937, was a revolutionary concept in its succinct definition of the aikibujutsu ideal of using the body as a weapon. This phrase became the basis of his lifelong investigation of the ways and means of budo and its application to practical methods of self-defense. During his tenure in Manchukuo 1934 – 1945, Tomiki was first a Professor at Daido Gakuin (a Manchukuo government official training college), and later also at Kenkoku University, the country’s premier college. Additionally during this period, he taught aikibujutsu to the Military Police of the Imperial Japanese Kwantung Army.

Though he was interred by the Soviets for three years after WWII, Tomiki continued his studies of budo. Upon his return to Japan in 1948, he joined the Kodokan as a part-time secretary, where he continued his study of judo and aikido. He practiced aikido one on one with Sato Shizuya from 1948 – 1951. When Tomiki became the aikido director of the Kodokan’s Strategic Air Command (SAC) martial arts program (1952 – 1956), Sato became the assistant aikido instructor, and remained so for the duration of the program.

Additionally, Tomiki Sensei is credited with leading the development committee of the Kodokan Goshin-jutsu (forms of self-defense) in 1956. Ultimately, Tomiki retired as Professor Emeritus of Physical Education at Waseda University, Tokyo, and founded the Japan Aikido Association, the capstone organization for Shodokan aikido (‘Tomiki ryu aikido’), now practiced worldwide.

Until mid-WWII, aikibujutsu hand-to-hand combat instruction (as directed by Ueshiba Morihei, and Tomiki Kenji, in Japan and Manchuria, respectively, as well as other instructors) comprised the core of combatives training for elite Imperial Japanese military personnel. During this period, the fundamental methods of aikibutsu, Kodokan goshin jutsu, and aikido were refined and compiled.

While Tomiki taught the Imperial military in Manchuria, Ueshiba Morihei directed training in Tokyo at the Toyama School (Army officer training school), the Nakano School (site of the famous Army intelligence officers’ program), and at the Navy School officer candidate school in Etajima.

The full curriculum of the Japanese Imperial military officers’ combatives training focused on 4 unarmed and armed martial arts:

- Aikibujutsu (Ueshiba and Tomiki’s early Daitoryu aikijujutsu-based martial arts)
- Tankenjutsu basic techniques (use of the short sword/bayonet)
- Kenjutsu basic techniques (Toyama ryu battojutsu)
- Jukenjutsu basic techniques (Japanese Imperial Army rifle bayonet training, incorporating both ancient
Japanese spear methods and modern European bayonet techniques)

All of these arts are still accessible today from the following organizations:

- Nihon Jujutsu - as taught at the U.S Embassy Tokyo Judo Club and affiliated clubs
- Tankenjutsu - sword-bayonet basic techniques, All Japan Jukendo Federation
- Toyama ryu iaido - taught by several organizations based in Japan
- Jukendo - rifle bayonet basic techniques, All Japan Jukendo Federation


The Kodokan and SAC

Meanwhile, during WWII, the Kodokan emphasized self-defense techniques over the sporting and spiritual aspects of judo; there also was a special self-defense kata developed for women during this period called joshi goshinho. The focus changed again after WWII largely to focus on sporting competition and eliminate the controversial self-defense aspects likely to draw negative attention from the Occupation authorities.

In 1952, the U.S. Air Force Strategic Air Command (SAC) sent two initial groups of airmen to the Kodokan to study judo, karatedo, aikido, and police techniques. This program was expanded through 1956, and by its end hundreds of U.S. Air Force martial arts instructors had trained under Sato sensei, who instructed both aikido (under head aikido instructor Tomiki) and taihojutsu techniques (under taihojutsu head instructor and senior Tokyo Metropolitan Police taihojutsu / judo instructor Hosokawa Kusuo). Other notable instructors included such Shotokan karatedo legends such as Funakoshi Gichin, Nakayama Masatoshi, Obata lsao, and Nishiyama Hidetaka.

In the early 1950’s, Sato sensei began teaching judo and self-defense at U.S. military facilities around Tokyo. In 1957, Sato sensei founded the U.S. Embassy Judo Club where he continued to develop and refine the techniques that ultimately evolved into Nihon Jujutsu.

During the same period, Tomiki sensei led the Kodokan committee that developed the Kodokan goshinjutsu series of techniques, an advanced self-defense curriculum. Interestingly, Nihon Jujutsu and Kodokan goshinjutsu feature many similar techniques, which is unsurprising given their extensive common roots in traditional jujutsu, judo, taihojutsu, and aikibujutsu.

The techniques and philosophy of Nihon Jujutsu represents the culmination of historical and modern development in gendai budo, the rational review of past practice in light of a changing world, and the preservation of traditions that form the core of budo.

The evolution of this system began before 1868, during the Edo era (1603 – 1868) in bujutsu schools, continued with the establishment of modern Japan, and culminated in the development of contemporary arts such as judo, aikibujutsu, aikido, and taihojutsu. Technical and philosophical developments during the 1930s and 1940s by premier judoka and aikidoka, imparted to Sato-Sensei during the early post-WWII years still comprise the essence of Nihon Jujutsu today. While the future of Nihon Jujutsu can be found in the hearts, minds, and bodies of Sato-Sensei’s direct students, and Nihon Jujutsu enthusiasts the world over.
””

We get students from around the world who seek to find a nice balance between judo and jujutsu techniques. Just recently a young lady from Austria joined us. Later this month we have a group of German judoka coming to practice nage ura waza no kata, one of Sato sensei's specialties.

http://www.usejc.com/




That is what I mean, don't look any further :big grin: :manoyes:
Maybe it would be a good thing if you would put up a little list of all the material we can be expecting from you in the near future. So that we can print the list, hand it over to our relatives and start saving money, which otherwise would be spend on less interesting stuff, like food and wine and the rent. :lol:

Happy landings,

Johan
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#13 User is offline   Jonesy 

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Posted 03 October 2010 - 09:25 PM

I have to ask - did Tomiki-sensei really have a doctorate and if so in what and from where?
Dr Llyr C Jones
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Posted 03 October 2010 - 10:49 PM

View Postjohan smits, on 04 October 2010 - 05:52 AM, said:

That is what I mean, don't look any further :big grin: :manoyes:
Maybe it would be a good thing if you would put up a little list of all the material we can be expecting from you in the near future. So that we can print the list, hand it over to our relatives and start saving money, which otherwise would be spend on less interesting stuff, like food and wine and the rent. :lol:

Happy landings,

Johan

If by 'near future' you mean sometime before the Second Coming, the End of Days, or Al Gore admits he's a bloviating idiot, yes, in the near future, you should see plenty of things from me. On a more human scale, it may take a while, unfortunately, since it has been amply demonstrated to me that the internet, combined with scanners and digital photos, has enabled massive theft of intellectual property on a scale unprecedented in history, and I have to eat to sustain my bulk and strength. Or at least the bulk.

I think you have to write a book large enough not to be shoplifted, thick enough not to go onto the flatbed scanner, and dangerous if you drop it on your foot. <_< That tends to limit the potential audience.

View PostJonesy, on 04 October 2010 - 06:25 AM, said:

I have to ask - did Tomiki-sensei really have a doctorate and if so in what and from where?

Good question... if your mind works in certain ways... :rolly:

I suspect not, actually, as nothing seems evident on Google, but will inquire, Herr Doktor Jones...




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Posted 04 October 2010 - 01:47 AM

View PostJonesy, on 04 October 2010 - 06:25 AM, said:

I have to ask - did Tomiki-sensei really have a doctorate and if so in what and from where?

I understand that he did not - the only degree I can find is a batchelor's in political science from Waseda.

Also, I found something that said he was actually hired as a calligraphy instructor, and he voluntarily coached the judo club, which he had captained as a student.

I'll poke around some more, but was told by one of his deshi, a guy who would certainly know, that he did not have a PhD.

Lg


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